Flax flowers bloom for one day. 

Flax flowers bloom for one day. 

Linen production

Flax is the name of the plant from which linen is derived. Linen has been grown and used for weaving clothing for 5 or 6 thousand years. The stems are processed into thread and the seeds are also the used in making nutritious flax seeds and flax seed oil.

Growing flax (in contrast with cotton) requires no pesticides or herbicides. Flax grows well in poor soil which means chemical fertilizers are not used. Linen is durable and wears beautifully becoming softer and softer with washing and use.  The processing of the fibers requires no chemicals – using only water or steam.  The final linen fabric finishing does not use any chemical finishing agents.

 

 

 
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Artwork and Silkscreening

Our artwork is selected from artists represented by Collect Studio in New York City. We choose patterns that may be hand painted, cut from paper or block printed. We then adapt the artwork to be hand silk screened. Our sensibility varies. Sometimes we feel bold and graphic and other times subtle and refined. 

Hand silkscreening the complete bolts of linen is a big job. Tables need to be 60 yards long. Fabric must be preshrunk in place. Screens are cut for each color to be printed. Ink colors must match our color standards exactly. All this is completed, before two craftsman lay the screens in place on the fabric, apply the ink and move down the table to create the patterns. Our printing process is not speedy, but, rather produces a design that embodies all the hands that have been a part of its creation.

 

 
Sewing is all by hand in Portland, Oregon.

Sewing is all by hand in Portland, Oregon.

Sewing

All of our production is sewn locally in Portland, Oregon. The cutting is done manually, sewing is on hand machines. We find that by taking the extra time and skill, these steps show in the final product.